Posted by on Sep 5, 2018 in Uncategorized
…From the Children’s Music Workshop’s “Top Ten Advocacy Points for Everyone”:

  • The Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania School District analyzed its 1997 dropout rate in terms of students’ musical experience. Students with no ensemble performance experience had a dropout rate of 7.4 percent. Students with one to two years of ensemble experience had a dropout rate of 1 percent, and those with three or more years of performance experience had a dropout rate of 0.0 percent. – Eleanor Chute, “Music and Art Lessons Do More Than Complement Three R’s,” Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, April 13, 1998.
  • Two research projects have found that music training – specifically piano instruction – can dramatically enhance children’s spatial-temporal reasoning skills, the skills crucial for greater success in subjects like math and science. – Shaw, Grazianow, and Peterson, Neurological Research, March 1999.
  • School leaders affirm that the single most critical factor in sustaining arts education in their schools is the active involvement of influential segments of the community. These community members help shape and implement the policies and programs of the district. – Gaining the Arts Advantage, The President’s Council on the Arts and Humanities, 1999.
  • Students with band and orchestra experience attend college at a rate twice the national average. – Bands Across the USA.
  • Music students out-perform non-music on achievement tests in reading and math. Skills such as reading, anticipating, memory, listening, forecasting, recall, and concentration are developed in musical performance, and these skills are valuable to students in math, reading, and science. – B. Friedman, “An Evaluation of the Achievement in Reading and Arithmetic of Pupils in Elementary School Instrumental Music Classes,” Dissertation Abstracts International.
  • One in three of today’s school-aged children will hold an arts-related job at some time in his or her career. – Education Commission on the States.
  • The College Board, in a publication about college admissions, states, “preparation in the arts will be valuable to college entrants whatever their intended field of study.” – Academic Preparation for College: What Students Need To Know and Be Able To Do, The College.
  • Music therapists working with Alzheimer’s patients have found that rhythmic interaction or listening to music resulted in decreased agitation, increased focus and concentration, enhanced ability to respond verbally and behaviorally, elimination of demented speech, improved ability to respond to questions, and better social interaction. – Carol Prickett and Randall Moore, “The Use of Music to Aid Memory of Alzheimer’s Patients,” Journal
    of Music Therapy, 1991.
  • Medical researchers have reported that subjects lowered bother their systolic and diastolic blood pressure as much as five points (mm/Hg) and reduced heart rates by four to five beats per minute following music listening sessions. People with high blood pressure can help keep their blood pressure down by listening to tapes of relaxing low frequency music in the morning and evening. – Tony Wigram, “The Psychological and Physiological Effects of Low Frequency Sound and Music,” Music Therapy Perspectives, 1995.
  • A 1997 Gallup Survey on Americans’ attitudes toward music revealed that 89% of respondents believe music helps a child’s overall development, and 93% believe that music is part of a well-rounded education. – Americans’ Attitudes Toward Music, The Gallup Organization, 1997.

…And from a variety of other sources:

  • “In academic situations, students in music programs are less likely to draw unfounded conclusions.” – Champions of Change, Federal study, 1999
  • A Columbia University study revealed that students in the arts are found to be more cooperative with teachers and peers, more self-confident, and better able to express their ideas. – Burton, 1999
  • Students who participate in the arts at least nine hours each week for at least a year are four times more likely to be recognized for academic achievement, three times more likely to be elected to class office, four times more likely to win a school attendance award, four times more likely to participate in a science and math fair, and four times more likely to win an award for writing an essay or poem. – National Governors Association Center for Best Practices. The Impact of Arts Education on Workforce Preparation. Issue Brief, May 1, 2002.
  • 2004 SAT takers who had taken courses in music appreciation scored 63 points higher on the verbal portion and 41 points higher on the math portion of the exam than their peers who took no courses in the arts. – MENC (now NAfME), “Scores of Students in the Arts,” nafme.org.
  • Adult choral singers in the United States volunteer in their communities at twice the rate of adults in general, are five times more likely to make political contributions and are three times more likely to contribute to other arts organizations than American households in general. – Chorus America. America’s Performing Art – A Study of Choruses, Choral Singers, and Their Impact, 2003.
  • Second and third grade students who were taught fractions through musical rhythms scored 100% higher on fractions tests than those who learned in the conventional manner. – “Rhythm Students Learn Fractions More Easily,” Neurological Research, March 15, 1999.
  • Students who participate in the arts at least nine hours each week for at least a year are four times more likely to be recognized for academic achievement, three times more likely to be elected to class office, four times more likely to win a school attendance award, four times more likely to participate in a science and math fair, and four times more likely to win an award for writing an essay or poem. – National Governors Association Center for Best Practices. The Impact of Arts Education on Workforce Preparation. Issue Brief, May 1, 2002.
  • College students majoring in music achieve scores higher than students of all other majors on college reading exams. – Carl Hartman, “Arts May Improve Students’ Grades,” The Associated Press, October 1999.
  • A research team exploring the link between music and intelligence reported that music training is far superior to computer instruction in dramatically enhancing children’s abstract reasoning skills, the skills necessary for learning math and science. – Shaw, Rauscher, Levine, Wright, Dennis and Newcomb, “Music training causes long-term enhancement of preschool children’s spatial-temporal reasoning,” Neurological Research, Vol. 19, February 1997.
  • In an analysis of U.S. Department of Education data on more than 25,000 secondary school students (NELS:88, National Education Longitudinal Survey), researchers found that students who report consistent high levels of involvement in instrumental music over the middle and high school years show “significantly higher levels of mathematics proficiency by grade 12.” This observation holds regardless of students’ socio-economic status, and differences in those who are involved with instrumental music vs. those who are not are more significant over time. – Catterall, James S., Richard Chapleau, and John Iwanaga. “Involvement in the Arts and Human Development: General Involvement and Intensive Involvement in Music and Theater Arts. “Los Angeles, CA: The Imagination Project at UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, 1999.
  • Research shows that when a child listens to classical music, the right hemisphere of the brain is activated, but when a child studies a musical instrument both left and right hemispheres of the brain “light up.” Significantly, the areas that become activated are the same areas that are involved in analytical and mathematical thinking. – Dee Dickinson, “Music and the Mind,” New Horizons for Learning, 1993.

Need even more?? Try these pages…

!! BOOKMARK THIS ONE !! …

  • ArtsEd Search (ArtsEd.org) – “The nation’s hub for research on the impact of the arts in education.” / and Browse Research on ArtsEd.org – Check out how the browse selection can filter outcomes by student, teacher, school day, and out-of-school-day. Also note the “Age Level” and “Policy Implications” tabs.